Recommended Reading: Defining the 21st Century

I just read and enjoyed this:

The iPhone is the best selling product ever, making Apple perhaps the best business ever. Because of the iPhone, Apple has managed to survive to a relatively old age.

Read “Defining the 21st Century”

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Remembering the First iPhone

I don’t remember much about the original iPhone announcement, back in January 2007. I’m sure it was a momentous keynote and I was thoroughly impressed at the time, but as I said, I don’t remember much of it today.

I do however remember the first time I held an iPhone in my hands and experienced it in the flesh: I was visiting a mobile technology research group in Vienna and they had two new touchscreen devices on hand to try out: the original, first generation Apple iPhone and the LG Prada phone. Superficially the two devices were similar, just as today every modern smartphone is similar to every other modern smartphone: A huge, high quality capacitive touchscreen and no physical hardware keyboard (which were a common fixture on phones at the time).

On first glance the LG Prada phone almost seemed preferable to me, with its elegant, consistent and more restrained visual design language, but when I picked up both phones and started playing around with them, the superiority of the iPhone became immediately obvious: The way it reacted to touches, the immediacy and fluidity of interaction was staggering and unlike anything I had ever experienced in a phone before. At that moment it was obvious to me that Apple had created something in a league of its own, something entirely new, something that defied superficial comparison with other phones on the market. This was the future of smartphones.

I never bought the original iPhone because of limited distribution here in Austria and for its lack of 3G connectivity, but I picked up its successor, an iPhone 3G, as soon as it became available.

Lightform: Augmenting Reality Through Projection

Lightform is an interesting little device: It does automatic mapping for full-room projection mapping, so you can hook it up to a projector and project interfaces anywhere in the room:

The device itself looks a little bit like a Kinect and the whole concept is reminiscent of Microsoft’s RoomAlive, IllumiRoom and Lightspace research projects, which isn’t entirely surprising considering that Lightform was developed by former Microsoft researcher Brett Jones, who worked on the IllumiRoom project.

I rather like the idea of augmenting the real world around us with projections because in a way it turns the traditional idea of augmented reality by wearing heads-up displays on its head. Instead of these individual, private augmented realities you get a shared, public, consensus augmented reality. Kinda like the difference between smartphones and large TVs I suppose.

You can read more about Lightform at Wired and The Verge, and for another take on automated projection mapping see Razer’s Ariana.

Recommended Reading: The first decade of augmented reality

I just read and enjoyed this:

In February 2006, Jeff Han gave a demo of an experimental ‘multitouch’ interface, as a ‘TED’ talk. I’ve embedded the video below. Watching this today, the things he shows seems pretty banal – every $50 Android phone does this! – and yet the audience, mostly relatively sophisticated and tech-focused people, gasps and applauds. What is banal now was amazing then.

Read “The first decade of augmented reality”

JSON Feed

Brent Simmons (creator of Netnewswire, my favorite feedreader for many years) and Manton Reece recently introduced JSON Feed, a JSON based alternative format to RSS and Atom. Dave Winer, the inventor of RSS (some people might argue about this claim, but not me), also shared his reaction. I think it’s safe to assume that he’s not a big fan of new, additional formats in general, and there are certainly good reasons for that. Of note, Dave Winer already proposed a JSON-based RSS format back in 2012, but it never took off.

Nevertheless, I’m happy this exists. I went looking for a JSON-based alternative to RSS a few years ago and was surprised that there weren’t any. JSON has replaced XML as developers’ choice for APIs and data exchange on the web, and in my personal experience it is much nicer to work with than XML. Let’s just hope it gains some traction, but early signs are looking good.

Recommended Reading: Escape to another world

I just read and enjoyed this:

The designers of the game of life, such as they are, may have erred in structuring the game in a way that encourages young people to seek an alternate reality. They have spread the thrills and valuable items too thinly and have tweaked the settings to reward special skills that cannot be mastered easily even by those prepared to spend long hours doing so. Unsurprisingly, some players are giving up, while others are filling the time not taken up in rewarding, well-compensated work with games painstakingly designed to make them feel good.

Read “Escape to another world”

Recommended Reading: How Uber Uses Psychological Tricks to Push Its Drivers’ Buttons

I just read and enjoyed this:

The secretive ride-hailing giant Uber rarely discusses internal matters in public. But in March, facing crises on multiple fronts, top officials convened a call for reporters to insist that Uber was changing its culture and would no longer tolerate “brilliant jerks.”

Read “How Uber Uses Psychological Tricks to Push Its Drivers’ Buttons”