JSON Feed

Brent Simmons (creator of Netnewswire, my favorite feedreader for many years) and Manton Reece recently introduced JSON Feed, a JSON based alternative format to RSS and Atom. Dave Winer, the inventor of RSS (some people might argue about this claim, but not me), also shared his reaction. I think it’s safe to assume that he’s not a big fan of new, additional formats in general, and there are certainly good reasons for that. Of note, Dave Winer already proposed a JSON-based RSS format back in 2012, but it never took off.

Nevertheless, I’m happy this exists. I went looking for a JSON-based alternative to RSS a few years ago and was surprised that there weren’t any. JSON has replaced XML as developers’ choice for APIs and data exchange on the web, and in my personal experience it is much nicer to work with than XML. Let’s just hope it gains some traction, but early signs are looking good.

Recommended Reading: Escape to another world

I just read and enjoyed this:

The designers of the game of life, such as they are, may have erred in structuring the game in a way that encourages young people to seek an alternate reality. They have spread the thrills and valuable items too thinly and have tweaked the settings to reward special skills that cannot be mastered easily even by those prepared to spend long hours doing so. Unsurprisingly, some players are giving up, while others are filling the time not taken up in rewarding, well-compensated work with games painstakingly designed to make them feel good.

Read “Escape to another world”

Recommended Reading: How Uber Uses Psychological Tricks to Push Its Drivers’ Buttons

I just read and enjoyed this:

The secretive ride-hailing giant Uber rarely discusses internal matters in public. But in March, facing crises on multiple fronts, top officials convened a call for reporters to insist that Uber was changing its culture and would no longer tolerate “brilliant jerks.”

Read “How Uber Uses Psychological Tricks to Push Its Drivers’ Buttons”

In Praise of Boring Design

I just read and enjoyed this:

Design-system builders should resist the lure of the new. Don’t confuse design-system work with a rebrand or a tech-stack overhaul. The system’s design patterns should be familiar, even boring.

The job is not to invent, but to curate.

Read “The Most Exciting Design Systems Are Boring”

Reminds me of a great article by Cap Watkins from a few years back (that for some reason I haven’t linked to before) about the boring designer:

The boring designer realizes that the glory isn’t in putting their personal stamp on everything they touch. In fact, most of the time, it’s about leaving no trace of themselves. The boring designer loves consistency. The boring designer loves a style guide. They love not having to worry about choosing the wrong blue or accidentally introducing a new pattern.

Also related: Obvious always wins.

 

Recommended Reading: Princeton researchers discover why AI become racist and sexist

I just read and enjoyed this:

Ever since Microsoft’s chatbot Tay started spouting racist commentary after 24 hours of interacting with humans on Twitter, it has been obvious that our AI creations can fall prey to human prejudice. Now a group of researchers has figured out one reason why that happens.

Read “Princeton researchers discover why AI become racist and sexist”