Recommended Reading: My Windows Rumspringa

I just read and enjoyed this:

If MacOS is trying very hard to hide a man behind a curtain, Windows 10 is handing out “You’re In Oz Now, Motherfucker” T-shirts. Hit the Start button — it might be the Windows button now, I’m not sure — and a wall of animated “Live Tiles” appear alongside the names and perfectly square program icons. One tile is advertising some software to buy. Another is showing Ed Sheeran doing something on Twitter.

Read “My Windows Rumspringa”

Recommended Reading: The case for a touchscreen Mac

I just read and enjoyed this:

When it comes to putting a touchscreen in a Mac, there’s a lot of talk about horizontal versus vertical surfaces. The conventional thinking is that you don’t want a touchscreen on a vertical surface, because your arms get tired if you hold them out for any length of time. And, while I agree that it would get fatiguing if you were to stand around for any length of time manipulating a vertical screen (Minority Report-style), I think that casual interaction—reaching up to tap something on a screen—is hardly the same thing.

Read “The case for a touchscreen Mac”

Razer’s Project Ariana

razer-ariana.jpg

There wasn’t a lot of things to get excited about at this year’s CES for me, but the Razer Ariana Projection System stood out:

Project Ariana projects an expanded view of a game on a wall to create a more immersive gaming experience. It’s based on Razer’s Chroma Lighting System. Microsoft presented a similar concept, Illumiroom, at CES 2013, but considering that was four years ago, I wouldn’t hold my breath for a commercial release version of that project. Hopefully Razer is more determined to bring Ariana to market.

Recommended Reading: Bots won’t replace apps. Better apps will replace apps.

I just read and enjoyed this:

Lately, everyone’s talking about “conversational UI.” It’s the next big thing. But the more articles I read on the topic, the more annoyed I get. It’s taken me so long to figure out why! Conversations, writes WIRED, can do things traditional GUIs can’t.

Read “Bots won’t replace apps. Better apps will replace apps.”

Superfluous Instructions in Apple Music App

The Apple Music app on iOS now displays an instructional card to tell users that they can scroll the viewport:

applemusiccard.jpg

When something that should be obvious isn’t, you don’t fix it by adding instructions. Instead, you accept that your design is bad and find a better solution.

As Donald Norman wrote in his seminal book The Design of Everyday Things: “Complex things may require explanation, but simple things should not.”

(via)