Is the iPad the harbinger of doom for personal computing?

I think that it’s a real possibility that in 10 years, general purpose computers will be seen as being strictly for developers and hobbyists. The descendants of the iPhone and iPad and their competitors will rule the consumer market and people will embrace the closed nature of these platforms for the same reason that Steve Levy hyped Palladium almost 10 years ago – because what you get for trading off freedom is reduced risk. There will be few (if any) viruses, and applications will “just work.”

General purpose computing is too complicated for most people anyway, and the iPad’s descendants along with similar competing products from other companies will offer an enticing alternative. So I see the death of the traditional, open personal computer as a likely occurrence.

rc3.org – Is the iPad the harbinger of doom for personal computing?

I recently came across this interesting bit on Stamen’s weblog:

One of our clients talked about how, far from the iPhone being a fancy phone for yuppies, it’s better to think about it as a primary computer for low-income people.

This seems even more important in light of the iPad announcement.

New Multi-touch Interactions on the Apple iPad

During Apple’s 90 minute unveiling of the iPad this week, a lot of new multi-touch interactions were shown off. But they went by fast. So as a service to digital product designers everywhere, we took the time to extract 8 minutes of new user interface demos from the iPad keynote. Now you can quickly just catch the UI in action on Apple’s new native iPad and iWork applications.

New Multi-touch Interactions on the Apple iPad | LukeW

Joe Hewitt on the iPad

Most of the iPad reactions I’ve read have been negative, but I have been completely satisfied with what Apple announced. iPad is exactly the product I’ve been wishing for ever since I wrapped my mind around the iPhone and its constraints. While the rumor mill was churning with all kinds of crazy possibilities for the Apple tablet, I mostly rolled my eyes, because I felt strongly that all Apple needed to do to revolutionize computing was simply to make an iPhone with a large screen. Anyone who feels underwhelmed by that doesn’t understand how much of the iPhone OS's potential is still untapped.

Joe Hewitt on the iPad.